PDF READ Great Expectations

Read & Download ´ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Û Charles Dickens

characters Great Expectations 100 Charles Dickens Û 0 characters Read & Download ´ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Û Charles Dickens Den and enigmatic circumstances he finds himself in possession of great expectations In this gripping tale of crime and guilt revenge and reward the compelling character. Great Expectationswere formedwere metand were thoroughly exceeded The votes have been tallied all doubts have been answered and it is official and in the books I am a full fledged foaming fanboy of Sir Dickens and sporting a massive man crush for literature s master story teller uick Aside My good friend Richard who despises Chuckles the Dick is no doubt having a conniption as he reads thisdeep breaths Richard deep breaths After love love loving A Tale of Two Cities I went into this one with you guessed it insert novel title and was nervous and wary of a serious let down in my sopho experience with Dickens Silly me there was zero reason for fear and this was even enjoyable than I had hoped Not uite as standing ovation inducing as A Tale of Two Cities but that was a function of the subject matter of A Tale of Two Cities being attractive to me PLOT SUMMARYHere Dickens tells the story of the growth and development of young Philip Pirrip Pip who begins his life as an orphan neglected and abused by his sister Mrs Joe Gargery I was always treated as if I had insisted on being born in opposition to the dictates of reason religion and morality and against the dissuading arguments of my best friends Through a series of chance encounters Pip rises above his disadvantaged beginnings to become a gentleman in every sense of the word Pip s journey is not a straight line and his strength of character and inner goodness are not unwavering but in the end they shine through and he the better for it THOUGHTS GUSHINGSDickens prose is the essence of engaging and his humor is both sharp and subtle and sends warm blasts of happy right into my cockles My sister Mrs Joe Gargery was than twenty years older than I and had established a great reputation with herself and the neighbors because she had brought me up by hand Having at that time to find out for myself what the expression meant and knowing her to have a hard and heavy hand and to be much in the habit of laying it upon her husband as well as upon me I supposed that Joe Gargery and I were both brought up by hand In addition to his ability to twist a phrase and infuse it with clever dry wit Dickens is able to brings similar skill across the entire emotional range When he tugs on the heart strings he does so as a maestro plucks the violin and you will feel played and thankful for the experience For now my repugnance to him had all melted away and in the hunted wounded shackled creature who held my hand in his I only saw a man who had meant to be my benefactor and who had felt affectionately gratefully and generously towards me with great constancy through a series of years I only saw in him a much better man than I had been to JoeWe spent as much money as we could and got as little for it as people could make up their minds to give us We were always or less miserable and most of our acuaintance were in the same condition There was a gay fiction among us that we were constantly enjoying ourselves and a skeleton truth that we never did To the best of my belief our case was in the last aspect a rather common one Dickens never bashes over the head with the emotional power of his prose In fact it is the uiet subtle method of his delivery of the darker emotions that make them so powerful OkayokayI ll stop on the prose I think I ve made my point that I love his writing Combine his polished breezy verse with his seemingly endless supply of memorable characters that is his trademark and you have the makings of a true classicwhich this happens to be There are so many uniue well drawn characters in this story alone that it is constantly amazing to me that he was able to so regularly populate his novels with such a numerous supply To name just a few Great Expectations gives us the wealthy and bitter Miss Havisham the good hearted but often weak social climbing main character Pip the good hearted criminal Magwitch the truly evil and despicable Orlick and Drummle the virtuous pillar of goodness Joe Gargery the abusive mean spirited never to be pleased Mrs Joe Gargery the cold and unemotional Estella the officious money grubbing Mr Pumblechook and the iconic Victorian businessman Mr Jaggers It s a veritable panoply of distinct personalities each with their own voice and their own part to play in this wonderful depiction of life in 19th Century London The only criticism I have for the book is that I tend to agree with some critics that the original sadder ending to the story was better and in keeping with the rest of the narrative However as someone who doesn t mind a happy ending especially with characters I have come to truly care for that is a relatively minor gripe 45 to 50 stars HIGHEST POSSIBLE RECOMMENDATIONS PS A few bonus uotes that I thought were too good not to share Pip In a word I was too cowardly to do what I knew to be right as I had been too cowardly to avoid doing what I knew to be wrong Joe to Pip If you can t get to be uncommon through going straight you ll never get to do it through going crooked

characters Great Expectations

Great Expectations

characters Great Expectations 100 Charles Dickens Û 0 characters Read & Download ´ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Û Charles Dickens S include Magwitch the fearful and fearsome convict; Estella whose beauty is excelled only by her haughtiness; and the embittered Miss Havisham an eccentric jilted bride. Admittedly I can be a bit dismissive of the classics By which I mean that many of my reviews resemble a drive by shooting This annoys some people if measured by the responses I m still getting to my torching of Moby Dick Even though I should expect some blowback I still get a little defensive I mean no one wants to be called a horrendous person just because he or she didn t like an overlong self indulgent self important epic about a douche y peg leg and a stupid whale I m no philistine I console myself with the belief that I have relatively decent taste For instance I don t listen to Nickelback I read the New Yorker and I haven t seen an Adam Sandler film in theaters since Punch Drunk Love Hating Melville does not make me a backwater provincial drunk on Boone s Farm Ken Follett novels and the cinema of Rob Schneider Indeed I have two principled reasons for not liking many certified classics Strike that I have one paranoid reason and one semi principled reason The paranoid first Have you ever noticed how difficult it is to read so many so called classics From the endless torments of Dostoyevsky to the prodigious length of Tolstoy to the impenetrability or weirdness of Joyce Faulkner or Pynchon the world s great novels seem needlessly excruciating I think it s a conspiracy A conspiracy of English majors and literature majors and critics all over the globe These individuals form an elitist guild like all guilds and licensing bodies their goal is to erect barriers to entry In this case the barriers to entry are Finnegan s Wake and In Search of Lost Time This snooty establishment has elevated the most dense inscrutable works to exalted status ensuring that the lower classes stay where they belong in the checkout aisle with Weekly World News and Op Center novels Isn t it possible that the only reasons the classics are classic is because they tell us they re classic What if they are wrong More frightening what if I m right Isn t it possible that all the greatest novels in history actually suck Am I the only one who thinks it possible that true greatness lies within Twilight I am Okay moving on My principled objection to various classic novels is that I love reading and have loved to read from an early age I also loved to complain from an early age To that end classics are the worst thing to ever happen to literature with the exception of Dan Brown Every drug dealer and fast food marketer knows that you have to hook kids early in life Forcing students to consume classics too soon is akin to the neighborhood dope peddler handing out asparagus and raw spinach The problem is worst in high schools where English teachers seem intent on strangling any nascent literary enjoyment in the crib At a fragile time in a young person s life a heaping dose of Homer not Simpson can be enough to break a reading habit for life At least that was my experience I first came across Charles Dickens Great Expectations when it was assigned my freshman year of high school It was a confusing time caught between lingering childhood I still had toys in my room and emerging adulthood by the end of the year I d get my drivers license Even though I d been a voracious reader it had always been on my own terms When my teacher tried to shove Dickens down my throat I started to lose interest in the written word and gain interest in the girls on the cheerleading chess team Thankfully I regained my joy of reading but it wasn t until I graduated from law school At that time I decided to go back and read all the stuff that was assigned in high school that I d either skimmed over or ignored completely Great Expectations was one of the first classics to which I returned Returned with a shudder I might add First off it wasn t as bad as I remembered Heck I liked it even So there Save your hate mail I do not come here to condemn Dickens merely to damn him with faint praise In many ways Great Expectations is prototypical Dickens it is big and sprawling it is told in the first person by a narrator who often seems resoundingly dull it is peopled with over eccentric supporting characters with unlikely names and its labyrinthine structure and unspooling digressions defy ordinary plot resolutions This is not a book that is getting to a sole point rather it s the tale of a boy s life with few details withheld It also limps to an unsatisfactory ending one of two endings actually since Dickens couldn t make up his mind that brings to mind the hastily reshot finale to the Jennifer AnistonVince Vaughn movie The Break Up The central character the first person narrator is an orphan surprise named Pip He lives with his mean sister and saintly husband Joe the simplest named of all Dickens creations This small unhappy family Pip s sister is forever peeved at the burden of taking care of her younger brother live in the marshes vividly described by Dickens as a cold creeping lunar landscape where prisoners rot in offshore prison hulks and cannons boom to raise the drowned It was a rimy morning and very damp I had seen the damp lying on the outside of my little window as if some goblin had been crying there all night and using the window for a pocket handkerchief Now I saw the damp lying on the bare hedges and spare grass like a coarser sort of spiders webs hanging itself from twig to twig and blade to blade On every rail and gate wet lay clammy and the marsh mist was so thick that the wooden finger on the post directing people to our village a direction which they never accepted for they never came there was invisible to me until I was uite close under it Then as I looked up at it while it dripped it seemed to my oppressed conscience like a phantom devoting me to the HulksPip s conscience is oppressed because of his Christmastime meeting with an escaped convict named Magwitch Pip helps Magwitch out of his shackles and steals him a pie and some brandy Later Magwitch is recaptured though Pip remains fearful that his role in the attempted escape will be discovered Later young Pip is taken to the home of the wealthy old Miss Havisham to play with her adopted daughter Estella Miss Havisham of course is one of Dickens most famous creations She was left at the altar as a younger woman and now whiles away her days in her crumbling wedding dress all the clocks in her house stopped at 840 Miss Havisham s sole delight seems to be in Estella s cruel treatment of poor Pip Nevertheless Pip falls in love with Estella Eventually Miss Havisham pays Joe for Pip s services and Pip returns to the marshes as a blacksmithing apprentice Once Pip found Joe s profession to be honorable Now however after all of Estella s scornful jibes Pip finds the work beneath his dignity This begins the long period of insufferable Pip who will constantly struggle to rise above his station while simultaneously racking up debts and alienating the people who truly love him At some point Pip is approached my Mr Jaggers a cunning lawyer with many clients who end up at the end of a noose he also has a compulsive propensity towards hand washing Jaggers informs Pip that he has a benefactor and that this benefactor has great expectations for Pip To receive his money Pip is told he must travel to London become a gentleman and retain his name Pip does so believing all the while that his benefactor is Miss Havisham If there is a spine to this book a central narrative thread it is Pip s pursuit of the lovely acidic Estella To this end Pip acts poorly in society goes in hock to his creditors and spars with Bentley Drummle for Estella s affections Of course this being a Dickens novel there is a lot swirling about Everywhere you look there are colorful satellite characters who seem all the lively for orbiting Pip Though unlikeable at times Pip is mostly dull Mainly I attribute this to the first person narrative It is easy to look out onto the world and harder to look inward Thus Pip is better at dramatizing the people he meets than in understanding himself One of the typical Dickensian eccentrics Pip encounters is John Wemmick a clerk for Mr Jaggers Wemmick lives in a house modeled after a castle and has a father The Aged P who has an affinity for firing off a cannon There is also Herbert Pocket who becomes friends with Pip even though their relationship begins with near fisticuffs Pocket comes from a huge dysfunctional family that Dickens describes with apparent glee Though Great Expectations is not as long as David Copperfield or Bleak House it sprawls enough to cause confusion Character lists may become necessary Of course Dickens hates randomness and it is worth bearing in mind that most of the people you meet even the secondary personages will tie back into the main story In Dickens London everybody knows everybody else and all are ruled by the Gods of Coincidence Great Expectations involves a bit of a twist I won t assume you know the substance of this twist the way Pip assumes the identity of his benefactor so I will not spoil it If it is possible to spoil something published in 1861 I feel like I have a hit and miss relationship with Dickens work Usually I m a fan of big messy epics The bigger and messier the better However with regards to Dickens I ve found that I like his shorter economical stories A Tale of Two Cities A Christmas Carol to his bursting at the seams behemoths I think this has something to do with payoff Usually when you read a novel it moves towards some sort of climax a set piece of action or emotional upheaval and resolution With Dickens though you are moving towards a lesson He was a great moralizer and critic and he used his novels as a canvas on which to make his points Great Expectations is no exception It is a homily directed at a Victorian England stratified by class and family background where station was defined even by lineage than by wealth Against this backdrop young Pip goes out into the world abandons his family and faithful old Joe makes horribly inaccurate judgments about people and finally learns that there is no place like home That s all well and good but not much of a reward for the days or weeks you devote to Great Expectations especially when you can learn the same thing after two hours of The Wizard of Oz

Read & Download ´ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Û Charles Dickens

characters Great Expectations 100 Charles Dickens Û 0 characters Read & Download ´ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Û Charles Dickens 'In what may be Dickens's best novel humble orphaned Pip is apprenticed to the dirty work of the forge but dares to dream of becoming a gentleman and one day under sud. My students and some of my friends can t ever figure out why I love this novel so much I explain how the characters are thoroughly original and yet timeless how the symbolism is rich and tasty and how the narrative itself is juicy and chock full of complexity but they just shake their heads at me in utter amazement and say What s wrong with you dudeWhat s wrong indeedI give them ten or fifteen years Perhaps they ll have to read it again in college or maybe they ll just try reading it again as an adult to see if they can try to figure out why it s such a classic but after some time has passed from their initial encounter with the novel they will find that I am not so crazy after all and that the book is in fact one of the best examples if not the best example of the novel This happens to me all the time I will re read something I was forced to read in middle school and high school remembering how much I hated it then and will find that I actually love it now as an adult Sure those classics may have taught me something about literary analysis symbolic patterns and the like but I couldn t appreciate it for its complexity until I was older I guess the rule of wine appreciation applies here too good taste only comes after much patience and experiencePerhaps the thing I love best about this novel is the cast of characters their names as well as their personalities Ms Havisham is one of my favorite characters to ever appear in all of the literature I have read There is so much density and complexion to her character that I could literally make an entire career out of writing discourses on her characterization She has even invaded the way I think about the world and the people I have met I have for instance started referring to those instances where parents try to achieve success through their children the Havisham effect unfortunately you see this all too often in the world of teaching Havisham s name is another exasperatingly fantastic aspect of her character like the majority of Dickens characters you pretty much know what you re in for when you first read her name she is full of lies tricks and deceits or shams You don t get this sort of characterization much of anywhere else in the literary sceneAnother reason I love this novel so much is its plotting Remember Dickens was writing in a serialized format so he needed to keep his readers hooked so that they d want to buy the next issue of his periodical All the Year Round in order to see what happens next Thus the plot of Great Expectations is winding unpredictable and uite shocking at points Certainly in terms of heavy action well what our youngsters these days would call action fighting and big explosions and what not there is none or very little at most but that s not the thing to be looking for Figure out the characters first and then once you ve gotten to know and even care for them or hate them you will be hooked on the plot because you will want to know what happens to these people who you ve invested so much feeling into This is of course true of all novels but it s what I tell my students when they read Great Expectations for the first time and by gum it s helped than a few of them get through the novel successfullySo if you read Great Expectations in middle school high school or college but haven t picked it up since I urge you to do so With a patient and experienced set of eyes you just might surprise yourself


10 thoughts on “PDF READ Great Expectations

  1. says: PDF READ Great Expectations

    PDF READ Great Expectations My students and some of my friends can't ever figure out why I love this novel so much I explain how the characters are thoroughly original and yet timeless how the symbolism is rich and tasty and how the narrative itself is juicy and chock full of complexity but they just shake their heads at me in utter amazem

  2. says: PDF READ Great Expectations

    PDF READ Great Expectations Read & Download ´ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Û Charles Dickens characters Great Expectations “There was a long hard time when I kept far from me the remembrance of what I had thrown away when I was uite ignorant of its worth” I first read Great Expectations when I was thirteen years old It was the first of Dickens' works that I'd read of my own volition the only other being Oliver Twist which we'd studied parts of in school You know I missed out on a lot when I was thirteen By this I mean that I didn't alway

  3. says: PDF READ Great Expectations

    characters Great Expectations PDF READ Great Expectations ”I saw that the bride within the bridal dress had withered like the dress and like the flowers and had no brightness left but the brightness of her sunken eyes I saw that the dress had been put upon the rounded figure of a young woman and that the figure upon which it now hung loose had shrunk to skin and bone” How do you do Miss Havis

  4. says: PDF READ Great Expectations

    PDF READ Great Expectations Charles Dickens Û 0 characters Read & Download ´ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Û Charles Dickens Pause you who read this and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold of thorns or flowers that would never have bound you but for the formation of the first link on one memorable day That is such a uote If there was ever a novel that shows us the dangers of false perceptions then it’s Great Expectations Pip is such a fool; he

  5. says: Read & Download ´ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Û Charles Dickens PDF READ Great Expectations Charles Dickens Û 0 characters

    PDF READ Great Expectations Read & Download ´ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Û Charles Dickens Charles Dickens Û 0 characters Great Expectationswere formedwere metand were thoroughly exceeded The votes have been tallied all doubts have been answered and it is official and in the books I am a full fledged foaming fanboy of Sir Dickens and sporting a massive man crus

  6. says: PDF READ Great Expectations

    PDF READ Great Expectations characters Great Expectations Boring dull lifeless and flat This is so drawn out and boring I kept having to remind myself what the plot was Best to get someone else to sum u

  7. says: Read & Download ´ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Û Charles Dickens PDF READ Great Expectations

    PDF READ Great Expectations Charles Dickens Û 0 characters Admittedly I can be a bit dismissive of the classics By which I mean that many of my reviews resemble a drive by

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    PDF READ Great Expectations Read & Download ´ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Û Charles Dickens 876 Great Expectations Charles DickensThe novel was first published as a serial in Dickens's weekly periodical All the Year Round from 1 December 1860 to August 1861 In October 1861 Chapman and Hall published the novel in three volumes On Christmas Eve around 1812 Pip an orphan who is about seven years old encounters an escaped convict in t

  9. says: PDF READ Great Expectations Charles Dickens Û 0 characters characters Great Expectations

    Charles Dickens Û 0 characters Read & Download ´ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Û Charles Dickens PDF READ Great Expectations I was really mad when I finished this book last night I have to say I enjoyed this much than the other Dickens' books I've read which is funny b

  10. says: PDF READ Great Expectations Charles Dickens Û 0 characters

    PDF READ Great Expectations “You are in every line I have ever read”Why couldn't every line in this book be this good? I took me nearly three who

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  • Paperback
  • 230
  • Great Expectations
  • Charles Dickens
  • en
  • 03 May 2018
  • 9781974627103